Breaking Waves: Ocean News

01/22/2023 - 22:00
A Guardian investigation has found that more than 90% of the carbon offsets verified by the company Verra did not reduce deforestation. Patrick Greenfield reports Companies across the world rely on carbon offsetting credits as a way to display their green credentials, but a Guardian analysis of scientific studies has found that many rainforest carbon credits are worthless. The investigation into Verra, which is the world’s leading carbon standard for the offsetting market, found that the vast majority of credits being bought are likely to be “phantom credits”. Verra has argued that the studies’ conclusions are incorrect, and questioned the methodology used. It also argues that its work has channelled billions of dollars into rainforest protection. Continue reading...
01/22/2023 - 21:00
In our latest episode, co-hosts Peter Ravella and Tyler Buckingham welcome Yi Liu and Dr. Keith Moore as our guests to discuss their recent paper, "Climate change could cause 'disaster' in the world's oceans: Deep overturning circulation collapses with strong warming." In the paper, Yi and Keith analyze projections from 36 climate models and find that the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and the Southern Meridional Overturning Circulation could slow by as much as 42% by 2100, and under worst-case warming, the SMOC could cease entirely by 2300. They explain that this could lead to a "climate disaster similar in magnitude to complete melting of the ice sheets on land." They also discuss the importance of overturning circulation in the ocean, and how it acts as a "solubility pump" and "biological pump" that helps remove CO2 from the atmosphere and supports marine ecosystems. They also stress the importance of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to prevent the complete shutdown of deep circulation in the future. Join us as we delve into the science behind this groundbreaking research and its potential implications for our planet.
01/22/2023 - 12:14
Brazilian president says predecessor emboldened wildcat miners which led to wrecked forests and disease and death among Indigenous people Brazil’s new president, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, has accused Jair Bolsonaro’s far-right administration of committing genocide against the Yanomami people of the Amazon, amid public outrage over a humanitarian catastrophe in the country’s largest Indigenous territory. Lula visited the Amazon state of Roraima on Saturday to denounce the plight of the Yanomami, whose supposedly protected lands have been plunged into crisis by government neglect and the explosion of illegal mining. Continue reading...
01/22/2023 - 11:07
National Grid asks Drax and EDF to start warming three plants and says it will activate its live demand flexibility service on Monday evening Britain’s electricity generators have been forced to warm up coal-fired power stations for the second time this winter and selected households will be paid to cut their electricity use for the first time as the cold snap persists. With a high-pressure weather system and associated light winds likely to dominate for a few more days, National Grid’s electricity system operator (ESO) said early on Sunday it had asked Drax to start “warming” two of its coal units at its North Yorkshire site and EDF to do the same for one at its West Burton plant in Nottinghamshire to ensure supplies on Monday. Continue reading...
01/22/2023 - 09:00
Growers fear a perfect storm for a tradition that has long bound rural communities together A sharp wind shunts clouds across the low and endless skies of La Mancha as Carlos Fernández stoops to pluck the last mauve flowers of the season from the cold earth. Their petals, which stain his index finger and thumb blue, enclose an almost weightless prize whose crimson threads are treasured in Spain and across the world. But despite the prices his crop fetches, and the weighty comparisons those prices inevitably invite, the life of a saffron grower is not without its trials, travails and frustrations. Continue reading...
01/22/2023 - 06:00
A town in the oil industry’s shadow grapples with health fears as the state fails to limit companies’ use of fresh water Towering refineries and rusty pumpjacks greet visitors driving along the highways of Kern county, California. Oil wells sit in the middle of fields of grapevines and almond trees. The air is heavy with dust and the scent of petroleum. The energy fields here are some of the most productive in the US, generating millions of barrels of oil annually and more than two-thirds of the state’s natural gas. And in a drought-stricken state, they’re also some of the thirstiest, consuming vast quantities of fresh water to extract stubborn oil. Continue reading...
01/22/2023 - 06:00
YQT community signs unprecedented agreement with coal company giving Indigenous leadership ‘veto’ on proposed project Two landmark deals in western Canada could reshape the role of Indigenous nations in resource development projects, placing greater power in the hands of groups that have long been excluded and signalling a possible shift in how industry and governments negotiate with communities on the frontlines of environmental degradation. In recent years, a string of fierce battles over pipelines have put a spotlight on the fractious nature of resource extraction projects, often pitting First Nations communities against powerful companies. Continue reading...
01/22/2023 - 02:30
Electric car battery firm planned to build large facility in Northumberland with government funds if it found investors Ministers were using the electric car battery maker Britishvolt as a prime example of the government’s record for “securing business investment in the UK” just months before the scheme collapsed without any public investment. The company, once heralded as Britain’s potential champion for battery making, fell into administration last week after the failure of last-ditch talks to find emergency funding to keep it afloat. Its demise has been criticised as showing the government’s lack of industrial strategy, the shortcomings of “levelling up” and Britain’s failure to grasp new manufacturing opportunities in the wake of Brexit. Continue reading...
01/21/2023 - 16:46
More than 3,000 people protest on estate of Alexander Darwall after his court victory ends right to wild camp in England More than 3,000 people joined one of the UK’s largest ever countryside access protests on Saturday on the Dartmoor estate of a wealthy landowner who won a case ending the right to wild camp in England. Groups of walkers, families, students and local people arrived by foot, shuttle bus and bike to the small Dartmoor village of Cornwood throughout the morning and then thronged for hours along moss- and ivy-draped lanes up on to the rugged, boulder-strewn moorland owned by the Conservative party donor and hedge fund manager Alexander Darwall. Continue reading...
01/21/2023 - 14:00
A combination of water technologies and cool building materials are more effective at tackling urban heat than greenery, a study has found Follow our Australia news live blog for the latest updates Get our morning and afternoon news emails, free app or daily news podcast The secret to more livable, cooler Australian cities may lie with the ancient Romans and a network of fountains like the Trevi and those in Piazza Navona, a new report on tackling urban heat has found. Rome has a network of 2,000 fountains which draw huge crowds daily to enjoy their cooling effects in the dense city. Sign up for Guardian Australia’s free morning and afternoon email newsletters for your daily news roundup Continue reading...