World Ocean Radio - Coastal Issues

Coastal Issues
January 23, 2024

Devastating weather and water events abound worldwide. Rain, flooding, strong winds, extreme high tides, coastal erosion and inundation have caused havoc in ports and on waterfronts. These events are neither new nor are they going away any time soon. While we will continue to rebuild and revive, the time is now to plan a response as complicated as the issues we face, to admit to mistakes made, and to welcome new policies and initiatives that build a future that works, even in the face of increasingly unpredictable climate events.

October 16, 2023

We are aware of the key role played by insurance, more so as we face increasing events of extreme weather destruction. Government agencies are signaling policy and coverage shifts, and there is a growing realization that existing policies and programs are not adequate to the new realities. Insurance is fundamental yet largely invisible until it is not there, and may be the driving force toward necessary change for the future.

October 17, 2022

This week on World Ocean Radio host Peter Neill shares observations from a recent trip to Greenland in collaboration with the Arctic Futures Institute. While visiting the four major coastal towns along the western coast, the melting glaciers that cover most of Greenland were dramatically visible. In this episode he discusses the several consequences of climate change and the rapid loss of sea ice.

September 20, 2022

This week on World Ocean Radio: a summary of fifteen new ocean challenges as identified by the conclusions of thirty conservation experts around the world, published in a July 2022 report in the journal "Nature Ecology and Evolution."

June 20, 2022

This summer we are revisiting some of our favorite World Ocean episodes that highlight optimism in ocean news, science and advocacy. In this episode we're talking about the history of oysters, New York Harbor, and the Harbor School—an innovative high school on Governor’s Island in New York City, highlighting their Billion Oyster Project, designed to revive the defunct oyster populations through an ambitious goal of restoring no less than one billion oysters to New York harbor. Harbor School's restorative ecosystem service activities are reconnecting the harbor to the 30 million people living within its vast urban watershed.

September 3, 2019

In the United States, planning and reparation for coastal flooding and damage has been administered under a National Flood Insurance Program that since 1978 has paid more than $40 billion in claims. In this episode of World Ocean Radio we outline some of the reasons why the program is not working, especially as extreme weather becomes more prevalent and levels of destruction more severe.

February 18, 2019

We wrap up our seven-part thematic overview of the ocean edge this week by discussing the cultural edge: the place alongshore where we interact with nature, with our spiritual selves, and with each other. We assert that the ocean is the ecosystem that connects us all, bringing us together as one population of humanity and civilization, capable of discovering solutions that will benefit all living things. The Cultural Edge is part 7 of a 7-part series dedicated to the ocean edge, exploring what takes place there, from the real to the symbolic.

February 11, 2019

We continue our thematic overview of the ocean edge this week with a conversation centered around coastal and offshore zones and the politics that define them. The Political Edge is part 6 of a 7-part series dedicated to the ocean edge, exploring what takes place there, from the real to the symbolic.

February 4, 2019

In this episode of World Ocean Radio we discuss the natural security provided by the ocean edge: the barrier effect of mangroves, beaches, cliffs, bluffs, atolls and more, and the ways that these places became and remain military and defense installations for protection of national interests. The Security Edge is part 5 of a 7-part series dedicated to the ocean edge, exploring what takes place there, from the real to the symbolic.

January 28, 2019

We have long enjoyed the ocean edge for leisurely ends: as a place to gather with family and friends to enjoy surf and sand, and to relax in the freedom and solace that being near the ocean provides. In this episode of World Ocean Radio we argue that we must reclaim the spaces near the ocean edge for recreation, for coastal protection and for authentic connection to the sea. The Leisure Edge is part 4 of a 7-part series dedicated to the ocean edge, exploring what takes place there, from the real to the symbolic.

January 21, 2019

This week we begin to present the ocean edge in thematic ways with The Working Edge, outlining the various social structures, industries, exchange, trade, globalization and more that were shaped by early settlement near the sea. The Working Edge is part 3 of a 7-part series dedicated to the ocean edge, exploring what takes place there, from the real to the symbolic.

January 15, 2019

How do we protect ourselves and our properties from storm surge and sea level rise? Last week we discussed the hard edge strategy of dikes, dams, gates and walls as barriers to the ocean. This week we continue our series with The Soft Edge, offering examples of more flexible ways to absorb the ocean's powerful force. The Soft Edge is part 2 of a 7-part series dedicated to the ocean edge, exploring what takes place there, from the real to the symbolic.

April 18, 2017

Seaports have long been places of commerce and trade: hubs connecting land and sea in an import/export exchange that contributes to regional, national, and global economies. In this episode of World Ocean Radio, host Peter Neill discusses the history of the port of Gaza on the Mediterranean Sea, the long-standing Israel-Palestine conflict, and recent interest in a project to build an artificial island off the coast for the purposes of creating a modern seaport which could possibly break through the political paralysis of the region, create employment opportunities, and enable an import/export revival.

December 6, 2016

This week we continue the Earth Optimism Series, a 24-episode project in partnership with the Smithsonian Institution's Ocean Portal, to address ocean solutions and innovative projects in the context of the Earth Optimism Summit, April 2017. In this episode, host Peter Neill talks about the revival of a once plummeting population of a spawning fish species on a river in Maine, made possible in part by conservationist action. He argues that victories for change and renewal are achievable when we engage as citizens at the local level.

October 25, 2016

In the 20th century, U.S. waterways had become dumping grounds for industrial, urban, and agricultural waste. Today many of these waterways are getting cleaner. In this episode of World Ocean Radio we highlight Tampa Bay, Florida, whose revival of seagrass and cleaner waters serve as an example of engagement, cooperation, determination, and leadership. What can be learned from this success as a means to meet environmental challenges and solve today’s problems?

September 28, 2015

Oysters have had a history of ebb and flow, plenty and scarcity, and in New York Harbor there was a time when the waters were so polluted that oyster populations diminished and interest in consumption vanished. Enter the Harbor School, an innovative high school on Governor’s Island on the East River in New York City. They have launched a project to revive the defunct oyster populations through an ambitious goal of restoring no less than one billion oysters to the harbor. In this episode of World Ocean Radio, host Peter Neill will discuss the school’s history and their restorative ecosystem service activities and their effort to reconnect the harbor to the 30 million people living within its vast urban watershed.

August 17, 2015

A San Diego County Water Authority project to construct a 6-acre desalination plant, the largest of its kind in the United States, comes at a time when the traditional water supply system in California is overwhelmed by changing climate, high agricultural demand, and high consumption by an increased population. In this episode of World Ocean Radio, host Peter Neill will describe the process of desalination, break down the numbers, and describe the objections to and development of this increasingly necessary technology which has the potential to produce billions of gallons of potable water per day.

May 4, 2014
March 29, 2013
March 22, 2013
February 13, 2013
November 24, 2012